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Protecting European Data Privacy: GDPR Compliance And Best Practices

Protecting European Data Privacy: GDPR Compliance And Best Practices

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) goes into effect in the European Union this week (on May 25). With these changes, data privacy protections are increasing substantially, as are the penalties for companies not in compliance.

Linguistic Systems has been working hard to ensure that our clients, translators, and producers who hold European data are informed and ready. Here are some highlights of how the new regulations will affect our translation processes, along with other strong protections we’ve had in place for many years.

Rights of European Union Clients

Under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), as a European Union resident, you have the following data privacy rights:

  • Opt-in consent: When you complete our project agreement (1) or an email marketing opt-in form (2), you understand and acknowledge that we may collect and hold your data for the purpose of communicating with you about your project (1) or about LSI services or offers (2).
  • Right to access and data portability: You may request from us a copy of your data.
  • Right to rectification/correction: You may request from us correction of your data.
  • Right to erasure/right to be forgotten: You may request from us erasure of your data, as permissible by law.
  • Right to breach notification: You have a right to be notified by us within 72 hours of a data breach we deem may pose a risk to your rights and freedoms as an individual.
  • Right to launch a complaint: You have the right to launch a complaint with your local supervisory authority, if you believe our handling of your data poses a risk to your rights and freedoms as an individual.

Data Security Best Practices

Even if you’re not in Europe, Linguistic Systems has always taken data privacy and security seriously. When your project enters our production process and data processing chain, we require all of our processors to maintain the confidentiality of the data and to follow basic data security best-practices. These include safeguarding the data from unauthorized access and accidental destruction or loss.

Rest assured, we do not use your data for any other purpose than to process and bill your job. And we do not submit your source material to any other third party or for any other purpose. Linguistic Systems is fully compliant with local, national and international data privacy regulations and we can customize our data security approach to match your company’s needs. We’ve worked hard to earn and maintain ISO certification related to the following three areas.

ISO 9001 – Certifies a company has a fully implemented quality management system. To maintain our certification, our workflows and quality management processes are subject to yearly internal and third-party audits, verifying that we continue to meet the requirements of the standard, including the requirement to monitor and continuously improve our service and customer satisfaction.

ISO 17100 – Certifies that as a language services company, we maintain a fully implemented translation quality management system. The requirements of this standard focus on ensuring the competency of translators and editors, and on the adequacy of verification processes to ensure quality in translations.

ISO 27001 – Certifies that we maintain a fully implemented information security management system. Linguistic Systems is transparent with auditors, and our processes offer data management at the highest levels.

We also make every effort to understand and adequately mitigate data security risks inherent in the language-conversion activities we undertake. With Linguistic Systems’ adherence to these ISO certifications, ongoing best practices, and new GDPR compliance efforts, you can rest assured that your project documents and personal data are being cared for. Your data is safe and sound with us.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Linguistic Systems uses a combination of advanced proprietary technology and 7,500 skilled, certified translators to deliver high-quality translations in 120+ languages. With 50+ years and billions of words of experience serving 25,000 clients, including many Fortune 100 and AmLaw100 firms, you can trust us with your foreign language translations.

Neural Translation + Human Post-Editing: Is It Good Enough to Publish?

Neural Translation + Human Post-Editing: Is It Good Enough to Publish?

Will it look better at 1/3 less?

Neural translation (NT) is showing great promise as a baseline tool for high-volume content translation. Compared to (statistical) machine translation, Neural offers better comprehension and readability right out of the box.

Few would argue that the quality of Neural translation is good enough to publish as is. But what if a human post-edit is added? And not just a light post-edit (our level 3 of quality), but a full human post-edit (level 4)?

Would you, as a high-volume content publisher, use this process for final distribution in certain markets? What if it cost 33% less than a full human translation? Would you use it then?

These are the issues and opportunities being examined by many of our clients. Here’s some food for thought:

  • Most everyone would agree that (statistical) machine translation by itself is not sufficient for publishing. It even strains basic comprehension in many cases.
  • Adding a light or even a full human post-edit can improve output, but accuracy is far from guaranteed.
  • Neural translation relies on artificial intelligence to translate concepts, phrases, and sentences versus single words, so readability and comprehension are significantly improved. This makes it much easier to do a human post-edit.
  • Post-editing a neural translation therefore takes less time. It’s likely to be no less accurate. And it’s an easier process for a translator. So, it costs less.

Here is an example of the potential savings:

Full Human Translation

  • 1 File (300 words) human-translated into 1 language: $90
  • Cost for 6 languages $540
  • X 40 files per month (10 per week): $21,600
  • X 12 months: $259,200

Neural Translation Plus Full Post-Edit

  • 1 File, neural-translated into 1 language >$1
  • + Full human post-edit of neural translation $59
  • Cost for 6 languages $360
  • X 40 files per month (10 per week): $14,400
  • X 12 months $172,800

Annual Savings: $86,400 Percent Savings: 33%

A Practical Application

The best way to test the savings possible with Neural translation plus a full human post-edit may be to offer it to your internal translators. Could they process more content quicker, and with less frustration, if they were supplied with an NT + FPE translation to start? Is this an enormous time savings? Or do they end up checking the source material so often it’s not worth it?

We don’t prejudge the outcome for our clients. But at approximately 33% less, it may certainly be worth the test.

That’s why we’re offering to help you test it for yourself. You can submit a 3-page sample of your typical content and we’ll Neural-translate and full post-edit it, for free! Compare it to a full human edit to see if there’s much difference. Just click below to get started.

Finally, whatever your quality needs or desired process, we’re here to support you. NT + FPE is just one of our many solution options.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Linguistic Systems uses a combination of advanced proprietary technology and 7,500 skilled, certified translators to deliver high-quality translations in 120+ languages. With 50+ years and billions of words of experience serving 25,000 clients, including many Fortune 100 and AmLaw100 firms, you can trust us with your must-win foreign language translation projects. 

Legal Budget Uncertainty — 9 Solutions to Help Control Your Case Budget

Legal Budget Uncertainty — 9 Solutions to Help Control Your Case Budget

How much budget is enough? How much is too much?

You’re the Lead Counsel or Head of Litigation Prep for an important case. You have a massive quantity of foreign language documents to translate in a limited time.

To feel confident about the quality of your information and your ability to meet Court-imposed deadlines, budget is a huge factor.

How much will it cost your client to achieve the translation objectives and, more importantly, to win their case? How much is enough? How much is too much?

Linguistic Systems’ offers 9 solutions to address Budget Uncertainty, and we can help you feel confident in your translation spending. Here’s a quick look at those challenges and our solutions.

Overall Challenge: Budget Uncertainty

Translating everything via human translation can cost a small fortune. Machine translation can help you save. But if machine translations are unintelligible (which is often the case) or wrong, it can cost your client much more. Where do you cut?

We see 3 related concerns for this challenge: Budget Uncertainty, Resource Uncertainty, and Value Uncertainty. Here are our solution steps.

LSI Steps to Overcome Budget Uncertainty

— How much budget is needed to successfully achieve your case objectives? Will spending match your client’s expectations?

  • Pre-Project Cost Estimate — Quick analysis of likely process paths and timelines can provide a pre-project cost estimate and facilitate initial client signoff.
  • Approved Process Cost Estimate — Finalization of the cost estimate is achieved once the agreed process is determined and initial eDiscovery content streams are analyzed.
  • Contingencies Cost Estimate — Provides updates to agreed budget as case dynamics change or additional work becomes necessary and approved.

LSI Steps to Overcome Resource Uncertainty

— How many internal and external resources are needed to achieve case objectives? Do internal legal and LSI teams have the right quantity and skills mix?

  • Pre-Project Resource Audit — Analysis of internal legal team reviewer resources (both quantity and expertise) and available LSI team resources to determine if ‘project start’ resources are sufficient.
  • Project Resource Plan — Assignment of resources (sources and roles) to accomplish project at each stage of plan. Includes internal and LSI teams.
  • Resource Contingencies Plan — Provide recommendations for resource adjustments in reaction to changing case dynamics or translation results.

LSI Steps to Overcome Value Uncertainty

— Will the budget produce the desired translation results and achieve case objectives? Could the money be spent in better ways, for better results?

  • Pre-Project Value Assessment — Estimation of ROI of successful case outcome versus anticipated investment.
  • Mid-Project Optimization — Analysis of existing processes, costs, value and ROI during project execution to consider alternatives to improve outcomes.
  • Project Post-Mortem — Analysis of pre-case estimates and ROI versus actual results. Includes refinements for future projects.

LSI Translation Consulting Services can help you with all phases of foreign language legal translation. We know that winning your high-profile case is your only option. And we’ll help you overcome any uncertainty over your information, timelines, or budget. Just click below, and we’ll help you get started.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Linguistic Systems uses a combination of advanced proprietary technology and 7,500 skilled, certified translators to deliver high-quality translations in 120+ languages. With 50 years and billions of words of experience serving 25,000 clients, including many Fortune 100 and AmLaw100 firms, you can trust us with your must-win foreign language translation projects.

Legal Timeline Uncertainty — 9 Solutions to Help Control Your Case Schedule

Legal Timeline Uncertainty — 9 Solutions to Help Control Your Case Schedule

Part 2 of 3: Intelligent Translation Services Consulting

As an attorney, particularly the Lead Counsel on an important case, you’ve achieved much in your career by mitigating risk. But when aspects of the case aren’t in your control, it’s much harder.

An area where you sometimes have the least control is Court- or DOJ-imposed deadlines. If you’re required to produce thousands of foreign language documents in English within 3 weeks, that’s a hard-stop on your translation time. If you’re not lucky enough to secure an extension, you can still rest easy. Here’s why.

Linguistic Systems’ offers 9 solutions to address Timeline Uncertainty, and we can help you produce on time. Here’s a quick look at those challenges and our solutions.

Overall Challenge: Timeline Uncertainty

— Court-imposed deadlines may be unmovable. Do you have the right processes and resources to comply on time? We see 3 related concerns for this challenge: Deadline, Process, and Contingencies. Here are our solution steps.

LSI Steps to Overcome Deadline Uncertainty

— Are all case deadlines known? Are all project deadlines understood? Will any flexibility be granted in moving case deadlines?

  • Legal Deadlines Audit — Identification and consolidation of all court-related deadlines and delivery expectations.
  • Project Milestones Audit — Identification and consolidation of project milestones, associated deadlines, and assigned owners to achieve objectives.
  • Timeline Mitigation Recommendations — Identify deadlines most at risk and support a request to grant a document production continuance.

LSI Steps to Overcome Process Uncertainty

— Will the right process be chosen to enable your team to meet imposed deadlines? What are the tradeoffs for each process decision?

  • Process Tradeoff Discussion — Examination of pros and cons of each process option and how they might affect case strength, timelines, cost.
  • Process Recommendations — Development of multi-modal process strategy to achieve optimal results within agreed timelines and budget.
  • Project Burn Rate Analysis — Tracking and projection of delivery dates for each component of translation process, and likelihood of meeting deadlines.

LSI Steps to Overcome Future Uncertainty

— What additional, unforeseen deadlines may be imposed? Can the translation process and team support changing dynamics?

  • Timeline Flexibility Analysis — Where are the potential flex periods and logjams in the timeline?
  • Resource Flexibility Analysis — Which resources are potentially stretched, and which can provide additional capacity?
  • Project Scale Analysis — If new requirements and work efforts are added to the project, will the timeline be at risk? Where are the vulnerabilities?

At first glance, this may feel complex. But we’ve been executing complex translation projects for more than 50 years. We’re here to assist you.

In fact, we offer LSI Translation Consulting Services which address all phases of foreign language legal translation. We know that winning your high-profile case is your only option. We’re here to help in that regard.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Linguistic Systems uses a combination of advanced proprietary technology and 7,500 skilled, certified translators to deliver high-quality translations in 120+ languages. With 50 years and billions of words of experience serving 25,000 clients, including many Fortune 100 and AmLaw100 firms, you can trust us with your must-win foreign language translation projects.

9 Steps to Mitigate Legal Info Uncertainty

9 Steps to Mitigate Legal Info Uncertainty

Part 1 of 3: Intelligent Translation Services Consulting

If, like many of our clients, you’re leading a high-profile international legal case, these 3 challenges probably keep you up at night. They are Information Uncertainty, Timeline Uncertainty, and Budget Uncertainty.

Information Uncertainty is when a mountain emerges of foreign language documents that are central to your case. But they’re not in English. You’re not sure what’s in them. You don’t know the full extent of your client’s risk. And you’re going to have to rely on others — internal translators or external partners — to inform you.

Will they be right? And how much risk are you and your client facing?

The second major challenge is Timeline Uncertainty. The Court has imposed deadlines for you to produce thousands of documents — maybe tens or hundreds of thousands — in translated form. What combination of machine and human translation processes are needed to produce these on time? Is that enough time? What if an extension request isn’t granted?

The third major challenge is Budget Uncertainty. Translating hundreds of thousands of documents via human translators would cost your client a small fortune. It would also seriously strain your relationship to charge them that much.

Deploying machine translation technologies saves considerably, but sacrifices quality. True meaning can remain buried in hundreds of thousands of incomprehensible or imprecise partial sentences. How much should you spend for higher quality? How much is too much? How much is not enough?

The good news: We’ve thought long and hard about these issues during our 50+ years of serving major corporate and legal clients  — including most of the Fortune 100 and AmLaw 100. And we’ve developed solutions and processes that address each concern.

In fact, we’ve taken it farther. For each of the 3 previously mentioned challenges, we’ve identified 3 contributing concerns. And for each of these sub-concerns, we’ve developed 3 solutions to help alleviate your fears.

What’s the math on that? It translates to 27 LSI solutions (critical process steps) to address 9 contributing concerns related to your 3 major challenges.

In the first of this 3-part article, we’ve outlined the 9 solution steps below that can help you feel more confident about the relevance, accuracy, and expertise associated with your foreign document translations. Here are the first 9 solution steps.

Major Challenge: Information Uncertainty

Contributing Concern: Relevance Uncertainty

Will all relevant content be correctly identified and categorized?

LSI Solution Steps:

  • eDiscovery Audit — MT or Neural-based eDiscovery to enable preliminary evaluations and tagging of your client’s foreign-language content.
  • Outliers Audit — Development and refinement of custom glossaries to clarify untranslated words and expressions.
  • Post-Audit Validation — Human examination of MT results to validate, or modify, preliminary relevance and categorization decisions.

Contributing Concern: Expertise Uncertainty What additional industry, legal, or local/cultural expertise is needed? LSI Solution Steps:

  • Subject-Matter Audit of preliminary screened content to determine, collaboratively with you, what additional data or industry expertise is needed.
  • Localization Audit of high-value content to ensure that local meaning is correctly understood.
  • Internal Audit by your in-house legal review team to identify potential gaps in expertise to be augmented by LSI’s resources or network.

Contributing Concern: Accuracy Uncertainty Will all relevant content be accurately translated, verified, and understood? LSI Solution Steps:

  • Human Translation and Post-Editing of core segments of content that are of highest value and complexity — including for Court- or DOJ- mandated translation processes.
  • Content Risk Analysis — Determine collaboratively the value of translating (and potential risk of not translating) each content grouping.
  • Content Accuracy Analysis — Access the accuracy of content in high-value groupings using Blue Score or other means.

Finally, we don’t expect you to have 50 years of expertise in implementing these solution steps on your own. That’s why we’re here … to support you, to alleviate your concerns, and to ensure your success. To do that, we offer LSI Translation Services Consulting to assist you in all phases of foreign language legal translation. We know that winning your high-profile case is your only option. We’re here to help in that regard.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Linguistic Systems uses a combination of advanced proprietary technology and 7,500 skilled, certified translators to deliver high-quality translations in 120+ languages. With 50 years and billions of words of experience serving 25,000 clients, including many Fortune 100 and AmLaw100 firms, you can trust us with your must-win foreign language translation projects.

Monetize Your Association Assets — Build A Foreign Language Translation Library

Monetize Your Association Assets — Build A Foreign Language Translation Library

Your Foreign Language Translation Library Is A Hidden Asset

If you’re responsible for the growth of your association membership and/or the improvement of member services, a significant opportunity may be available for you. You can monetize one of your most important assets — your industry-specific terminology and knowledge — by building a foreign language translation library. This multilingual glossary enables members to enhance their translations with augmented intelligence.

This can help members to save significantly on foreign language translations. It’s a process they encounter all the time if they’re doing business in non-English speaking countries. And who isn’t these days?

Here’s what typically happens:

  • A member company needs to translate its product documentation, promotional content, advertising, Web site, contracts, or other essential communications related to their business.
  • They engage a translation company and pay the going rate to translate EVERY WORD of their content. And they pay too much.
  • If they expect to do a number of translation projects, they might work with their language service provider to build a library of the most commonly used words, terms, and expressions which are particular to their business and, most likely, to their industry.
  • On subsequent projects, this library serves as a repository of already translated terms. This means your member will save time and money by not having to translate the same words again.

Now, imagine that instead of building a library of already translated terms on their own, one project at a time, members benefit from referencing a massive library of words, terms, and expressions across your entire industry or association? It would include terms they may not have thought about yet, but ones that have proven important to other members who are more advanced in their business.

And imagine if this massive industry library of relevant terms was set up and owned by your association? How much would that be worth to you each year in member retention and acquisition? It could be a standard benefit for everyone, or you could monetize it further by offering it as a premium service.

How would you go about setting up such a valuable library? You would talk to us. We’ve been in the translation business for 50 years — serving major Fortune 100 and AmLaw 100 clients for decades. And we’ve been building and managing sometimes massive proprietary libraries for almost all of them. We offer:

  • the technology (including machine, neural, and human translation);
  • the know-how (including fluency in 120+ languages and cultures, and a carefully screened and tested network of 7,500 translators);
  • and the experience (including 50 years of service and 6 quality and cost options).

Finally, your data will be secure. Any library we create for you will be proprietary to your association and the members to whom you provide access. No one else will access your data. Our ISO 27001 certification in information security management guarantees it.

Monetize your industry knowledge for your members, and your association, today.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Linguistic Systems uses a combination of advanced proprietary technology and 7,500 skilled, certified translators to deliver high-quality translations in 120+ languages. With 50 years and billions of words of experience serving 25,000 clients, you can trust us to build your foreign language translation library.

Translation Outsourcing: Hand Us Your Heavy Translation Responsibility

Translation Outsourcing: Hand Us Your Heavy Translation Responsibility

What Would You Do With More Time And Less Anxiety?

Admit it. You probably hate securing quotes when you have a new translation project. It’s a disruption to your regular routine. It requires you to devote a concentrated amount of time and effort to the process. And it causes anxiety as you wonder whether you’ve invited enough providers, selected the right process, and secured the best pricing.

You have better things to do with your time. So do we.

Don’t misunderstand, we’re excited each time you or other clients request a quote from us for translation services. Because more often than not, it means new business. But as efficient as we are at providing quotes, it’s a minor core competency for us — translations are our big one.

Some of our biggest and best clients —  including a global information technology publisher, an international insurance company, and a nationally recognized law firm — use a clever strategy we’d like you to consider. They outsource their translations to us.

These clients have negotiated a prescribed service level and discounted pricing structure with us in advance. So we no longer need to repeat that process on each job. Our pricing is aggressively low, the value is high, and the work effort we deliver is superb. Everyone is happy.

We don’t need to drop what we’re doing to repeatedly generate new quotes, we simply focus on turning around great translations — quickly, competently, and reliably. The work comes in daily. We simply discuss project details, priorities, deadlines, and project costs, and we can adjust the level of information to whatever your process requires.

We get to do what we do best. You gain back an enormous chunk of time and peace-of-mind.

So consider translation outsourcing with us. You’ll only have to request a quote one more time; and yes, it might take a bit longer, but then we can focus on getting the work done. It will be awesome. We promise.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Linguistic Systems uses a combination of advanced proprietary technology and 7,500 skilled, certified translators to deliver high-quality translations in 120+ languages. With 50 years and billions of words of experience serving 25,000 clients, you can trust us to be your translation outsourcing service provider.

Behavioral Targeting: What 60% of Foreign Buyers Prefer

Behavioral Targeting: What 60% of Foreign Buyers Prefer

The Mother of All Behavioral Differentiators

If you’re a marketer or product owner, behavioral targeting is an awesome aspect of the digital age. You can better understand the behaviors of current and potential customers by observing their real-world actions – typically online or on your site.

Behavioral targeting is presumed to be a strong predictor of consumers’ intentions and future behavior. For example, if someone performs a search related to a specific software application, and then they visit your site and two international competitors that offer similar solutions, it’s assumed they’re in the process of evaluating the benefits of this software.

” … what if you’re ignoring the strongest predictor of international consumers’ intentions, preferences, and purchasing behavior?”

If they spend considerable time on your pricing page, it may be evidence that they’re closing in on a buying decision. And if they next click on your website’s little flags to see what languages you offer, it might be assumed they’re looking for your international pricing. And this conclusion could be very wrong.

Behavioral targeting is not an exact science. It analyzes millions of data points and micro-events to attempt to predict what consumers prefer and what they’re likely to do next. But it can miss the strongest predictor of international consumers’ intentions, preferences, and purchasing behavior? Want to know what that is?

It’s their native language. It’s what they spoke as they learned to communicate for the first time. They spoke it before they left home … before they may have attended college … and before they learned English as a second (or third, or fourth) language to further their career.

Why is communicating in native language so important?

Our “mother-tongue,” likely, came from our mother. Its sounds and rhythm connect with us at a deep emotional level – in the parts of our brain where most decision-making originates. When customers are making decisions about your products or brand, it makes sense to persuade them in the language they’re most connected to.

There’s more evidence from research firm, Common Sense Advisory. In their study of 3,002 ecommerce buyers from 10 countries, “Can’t Read, Won’t Buy,” 56% of consumers declared that they spent more time browsing sites in their native language (than in English), or they boycotted English-language sites altogether. (For more details, see our related article: How to Increase Web Content Engagement Internationally.)

In terms of purchasing, the study found that 60% of foreign-language consumers rarely or never purchase from English language sites while only 12% make “most or all” purchases on English-language sites. (See our second related article: Target Your eCommerce Translation Dollars.)

Can you afford to write off more than half of your foreign-language visitors and potential buyers? We didn’t think so either.

To put your behavioral targeting on steroids, start by communicating in native language with your international prospects. It’s like doubling your reach for the cost of a translation. And you’ll be connecting with customers at a deeper level, in the language they prefer … their own.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Linguistic Systems uses a combination of advanced proprietary technology and 7,500 skilled, certified translators to deliver high-quality translations in 120+ languages. Trust us with your next translation project.

Machine Translation: The Hidden Value of Outliers

Machine Translation: The Hidden Value of Outliers

Would You Invest $1 for Enhanced Machine Translation to Save $198?

Savings can hide in the most curious places – particularly when doing machine translation (MT) to translate vast quantities of foreign language content.

Machine translation is usually the starting point in the legal profession, corporate law, and many other high-volume content situations in order to churn through large amounts of foreign-language documents. But as powerful as machine translation engines can be, there are countless words that MT engines aren’t trained to know.

These “outlier” words can take many forms:

• No machine translation engine contains all the words of a language (e.g., English is thought to have more than 1 million words);

• Words may have multiple uses, and machine translation can mistakenly apply the wrong context (e.g., “cranes by the riverbank” referring to birds and a body of water, are not the same as “construction cranes used to build the bank by the river”);

• Some words may be rarely used (e.g., in English where grammatical use has changed, words like “thee,” “thy,” and “whom” may be unknown);

• Words may be newly created (e.g., in German and Russian, it is common to see new words pop up or combinations of words with new concepts);

• Company names and product names should generally not be translated, although there are certainly exceptions in some languages; • Personal names should not be translated, (e.g. – “Mr. Grey” is a person and not a “man of a certain color”);

• Some chemical compound names may not be present in a machine translation word repository; • Industry-specific terms may not be widely known outside the industry.

What do you do with these “outlier” words?

Linguistic Systems’ translation analytics capability allows us to extract all words that the machine translation engine “did not translate” (DNT). An output file of those words is then created which includes the number of times they occurred. This file is used to create a new proprietary client glossary (or to update existing glossaries) with DNT words. The glossary then serves as a reference for the machine translation engine, for this client’s specific project or case going forward.

The next step is most important. We collaborate offline with our clients to prioritize and define the outliers so they can be added to a custom glossary with “DNT” words for that client and project. The job can then be rerun with the custom glossary. The result: Significant savings of both time and money for a portion of the files. Here’s how it works.

“The process keeps getting quicker, more efficient, and less expensive with each additional job.”

Economics

Here are the numbers for a project that contains 2,000 files to be translated. Starting with machine translation, we might run 400 files (one fifth) as straight MT with no updated glossary. (We would leverage glossaries if they exist from previous jobs.)

Our machine translation engine would isolate the outlier “DNT” words and their number of instances. After collaborating with the client, the project is rerun – all 2,000 files — with the updated glossary in place.

To use round numbers, let’s assume that straight machine translation is charged out at $1 per document. The cost might go to $2 per document for enhanced machine translation (using the custom glossary) on the 400 documents to be examined more deeply. However, this $1 increase per file may enable savings of much more for this segment of identified files where human post-editing is recommended to significantly improve clarity.

Post-editing could run $200 per document for the files that require it. That’s $198 per file in savings times 400 files, which translates to $79,200 in savings by not having to post-edit that segment of machine translation work.

There should also be a significant savings in time if machine translation plus an augmented glossary can be used. The next time a project is run for that same client, a more robust glossary is already in place, and collaboration time on new “outliers” should be less. The process keeps getting quicker, more efficient, and less expensive with each additional job.

Machine translation is still limited in its quality. Even files that have gone through an enhanced glossary may require additional human translation if their end purpose demands it.

Machine translation — even with enhanced glossaries and post-editing — is nowhere near “certification grade.” An attorney could not go into court unless the content has gone through a full and careful human edit. But by augmenting the machine translation process with custom glossaries, this can be a very cost-effective option for segments of large projects.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Linguistic Systems uses a combination of advanced proprietary technology and 7,500 skilled, certified translators to deliver high-quality translations in 120+ languages. Trust us with your next translation project.

Target Your eCommerce Translation Dollars

Target Your eCommerce Translation Dollars

Optimize Your eCommerce Translation Budget and Cover More Markets

Most ecommerce buyers prefer to purchase in their own language. Not a revolutionary concept, right?

But there’s a way to target your ecommerce website translations smartly so that you preserve precious translation dollars while covering more countries than you may have thought possible. This article will explain how.

(Note: As background, we covered the lead-up to this article in a related post on international engagement.)

According to a Common Sense Advisory study of 3,002 ecommerce buyers across 10 non-English speaking countries, 60% buy on English language sites “never or rarely,” while another 28% buy only “some things in English.” That’s as many as 88% of non-English speaking buyers who prefer to shop in their native language.

Want more proof? CSA found that 73% of Japanese ecommerce buyers preferred buying from sites that were in their native tongue. 61% of French purchasers felt the same, as did 58% of Germans and 54% of Chinese.

Accepting that native language content is arguably the ideal strategy in any foreign language market, it may not always be affordable. We get that. 

“Respondents were 74% more likely to purchase the same brand again if the after-sales care is in their own language.”

And having to drop an important country from translation consideration because of cost means you may have to choose between France versus Germany or China versus Japan where your ecommerce website content will appear in all-English. Not a preferred choice.

The good news: Common Sense Advisory has identified key areas of ecommerce web content where you can best target your translation dollars with a hybrid strategy, and afford to cover more countries in the process.

Here’s what they found:

• For similar products, 75% of respondents prefer to purchase from sites that have product information in native language. Product information was associated with pre-sales decision making.

• For post-sales support, 51% buy only from sites with the user instructions or owner’s manual in native language.

• Prospects expect product information in their own language during the decision-making process although they are more accepting of post-sales support materials in English because these are thought to be needed only if there is a problem.

An examination of the effect of brand awareness produced interesting findings as well:

• 66% of respondents would prefer to purchase from a global brand with a good reputation (even if not all content is in native language) over a little-known local brand. However, this interest drops off significantly as respondents’ English language skills decline.

• The brands which are best positioned to capitalize on this phenomena are well-known consumer brands whose products need little instruction related to how they should be consumed. Examples include apparel, personal care products, electronics, food, etc.

• Brands who should strongly consider translating their content are those that are less-known in foreign markets or those serving business-to-business markets, technical and medical fields, or other complex areas.

In relation to repeat or follow-on sales, the CSA report had some of its most important insights:

• Respondents were 74% more likely to purchase the same brand again if the after-sales care is in their own language.

• This was true across all levels of English proficiency, and particularly relevant for industries that rely on recurring sales or where the lifetime value is higher than the return from a first sale.

• Translating product manuals and user guides is far less expensive than staffing call centers in multiple languages – particularly in high-wage markets such as Germany or Japan.

The main takeaway is that you don’t need to translate everything to be successful with your ecommerce in foreign markets. But by targeting your translation dollars to key stages of the customer journey, you can afford to cover more markets than you may have thought.

Can’t Read, Won’t Buy: How Translation Affects the Web Customer Experience and E-Commerce Growth was written by Donald A. DePalma, Vijayalaxmi Hegde, and Robert G. Stewart, February 2014, published by Common Sense Advisory.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Linguistic Systems has delivered high-quality translations in 120+ languages for 50 years. Trust us with your next translation project.

How to Sleep in a Foreign Language: A Guide for Compliance Officers

How to Sleep in a Foreign Language: A Guide for Compliance Officers

The Right Translation Strategy Can Help You Rest Easy

As a compliance officer, you’re under-appreciated. It’s not hard to come away with that impression after reading Joanna Belbey’s article in Forbes (referenced below), “7 Nightmares Keeping Chief Compliance Officers Awake at Night.”

Your team is often the scape-goat when senior executives are “shocked” to learn of legal and regulatory exposures. Yet when compliance issues are successfully managed, you typically encounter an air of expectation and a pressure to reduce budgets.

Further complicating the challenges for your team is an explosion of foreign language content and communications that must be translated before being assessed for compliance purposes. Otherwise, huge exposures could potentially be missed.

As a solution to the “nightmares” raised in the Forbes article, here are 7 suggestions to help you sleep better.

“You’re likely to be far more at risk in your foreign operations than in the US, yet your focus may be the reverse.”

 
1) Protect Your Personal Liability Internationally

Compliance officers are shouldering the risk when their company’s practices are found to be lacking. Non-English documents and communications are often not scrutinized internally to the same degree as the original English content.

Here are just a couple of causes: Your English-speaking team members may be unconsciously avoiding something linguistically and culturally unfamiliar. Secondly, your foreign employees operate within a culturally different frame of reference, so US-centric compliance regulations may be unnatural to them and either forgotten or inadvertently ignored.

But given the amount of work we do for government regulatory agencies, you can bet the other side is not shy about looking for your legal exposures in whichever language(s) they reside. You’re likely to be far more at risk in your foreign operations than in the US, yet your focus may be the reverse.

Consider realigning your focus to put more emphasis on international communications.

2) Optimize Your Budget by Going Hybrid

Lack of sufficient budget in compliance has become business as usual. Foreign language translation costs, like everything else, go under the microscope.

For foreign language translations, the choice is often between machine translation (MT), which is often seriously inaccurate and very risky for compliance purposes, and human translation which is high quality but expensive. In most instances, your best solution is a hybrid approach that starts with MT but adds the desired level of human post-editing to optimize for both quality and budget.

(Note: Linguistic Systems offers 6 optimization options, and other translation companies offer hybrid options as well.)

3) Foreign Finesse vs. Fines

There was a time when senior executives tolerated an acceptable level of non-compliance and just paid the fines. Not anymore. Fines are much larger today according to Forbes, and the risk to a company’s reputation and ongoing business are too great.

Global corporations are often seen as a lucrative target by European or other non-US regulatory bodies. And you can be sure they know their languages, business practices, and loopholes better than you do.

You must arm yourself with the highest quality, most-accurate, foreign language translations possible. Your outcome in court may one day depend on it.

4) Map Out a Better Foreign Language Compliance Process

When new regulations come forth, and you have thousands of employees around the world who need to be updated and trained in their native languages, translations can’t be an after-thought. They must be integral to your ongoing process.

Similarly, when an international exposure is discovered — hopefully in its early stage and by your team, not a regulatory agency — you don’t want it to be a chaotic, stressful event that is outside your normal process.

There are ways to identify, respond to, and reduce exposures from foreign language content and business practices. A highly-experienced translation services company should be able to advise you on translation best practices, at no charge.

(Note: Linguistic Systems offers free consulting expertise and has earned and maintains 3 ISO certifications for Quality Management, Translation Services Quality, and Information Security.)

5) Proactivity vs. Zero Tolerance

Too often, drastic corrective measures (including firings) are implemented when non-compliance issues arise. The Forbes article cites international banks as too reliant on this approach.

Accurate translation can often prevent misunderstanding and reveal problems at an early point, before serious infractions get out of hand. Monitoring through translation is a modest cost for continuously maintaining control of compliance issues.

6) The eDiscovery Channel

An explosion of new channels of communication, including many that may be largely unknown in the US, can be scary for compliance officers. How do you monitor communications and mitigate exposures in channels you don’t even know are being used?

By filtering these communications through an eDiscovery platform like kCura’s Relativity, you maintain better control over your out-of-country communications.

And when Relativity encounters foreign language content, Linguistic Systems’ STS Translation Plugin for Relativity enables your team to handle the translations quickly, seamlessly, and affordably – without executing a separate process.

7) Technology Can Help You Save

Compliance teams are now expected to manage vast amounts of data at modest cost. As noted above, kCura’s Relativity, pre-loaded with the LSI Translation Plugin for Relativity, is a best-in-class solution used extensively by the legal community and major corporations to process massive amounts of English or foreign language data.

By processing translations within Relativity using the unique LSI plugin, it is not uncommon to save a third of the cost of translations.

…….

Hopefully, a few of these solutions will help you to sleep a bit better, knowing that foreign language translations can help monitor activity in other cultures in ways that can minimize processing time and cost.

“7 Nightmares Keeping Chief Compliance Officers Awake at Night” was written by Joanna Belbey and published in Forbes on July 29, 2016.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Linguistic Systems has delivered high-quality translations in 120+ languages for 50 years. Trust us with your next translation project.

Creating a Safe Space for Foreign Language Therapy

Creating a Safe Space for Foreign Language Therapy

How to Keep Interpreters from Stepping on the Therapy Process

Imagine a situation where, as a therapist, you’re working hard to build trust with a patient whose native language is not yours. And your language is not theirs.

You suspect they desperately need help. They may have experienced significant trauma, even physical or sexual abuse, in getting to their new country. Perhaps they’ve been here a while but finally worked up the courage to seek therapy, or they received the support to enable them to come forward.

Yet the process typically requires a patient to communicate in a second language, or for you to learn a new one. This is not ideal. Often our most traumatic memories are locked deep inside, accessed best — or only — by our native tongue.

” … interpreters can sometimes interfere with the counseling process [if they] do not understand psychotherapy or their role”

 

For these situations, foreign language interpreters can be a blessing. They are used often in trauma therapy situations where children, immigrants, or other non-natives are at a disadvantage by not knowing the therapist’s first language.

However, as Lisa Aronson Fontes detailed in her insightful article in Psychology Today (referenced below) which spurred our thoughts on this matter, interpreters can sometimes interfere with the counseling process. She cites several examples where interpreters who do not understand psychotherapy or their role inadvertently step on the process. For example:

  • An interpreter comforts a weeping client not to get upset;
  • An interpreter imposes their own value judgments on what is being relayed and advises the patient to modify what they are saying;
  • An interpreter “cleans up” the clients’ language — suppressing curse words, baby talk, incoherent phrases, or discussion of sexual matters;
  • An interpreter fails to convey certain statements – trying to “protect” the client or the client’s community from losing face;
  • An interpreter answers a client’s question without conveying the question to the clinician;
  • An interpreter fails to convey a clinician’s comment or question, believing it is inappropriate or overly intrusive.

So how do you safeguard against this “unintended” interference?

Linguistic Systems has developed a Code of Conduct that all interpreters must understand, acknowledge, and agree to before being placed in a job. The agreement stipulates, among other things, that the interpreters must:

  • Render a complete and accurate interpretation of the matter discussed, without altering, omitting, or adding anything, and without additional explanation or clarification, unless explicitly requested during the interpreting session;
  • Limit themselves to interpreting, without giving legal or other [medical or therapeutic] advice;
  • Faithfully preserve and convey the meaning of what is being said, including style, register, idiomatic expression, even tone of voice. Each spoken statement, including those that may appear obscene, rude, rambling, misleading, incoherent, or false, should be interpreted and rendered precisely and accurately as spoken in the source language;
  • Protect and uphold the confidentiality of all privileged information obtained during the assignment;
  • Ask permission from the parties to explain any potential interpreting problems that arise, and state the reason why such explanation is necessary;
  • Correct any potential errors in interpretation that may arise;
  • Conduct themselves in a professional and courteous manner.

No agreement can be a complete safeguard against interpreting issues that may arise. But by sharing written expectations with interpreters and by requiring their acknowledgement and agreement in advance, an agreement is a key training and compliance tool that helps interpreters to go into a job with the right mindset.

“Translating Trauma: Foreign Language Interpreting in Therapy” was published March 23, 2017 by Psychology Today. It was authored by Lisa Aronson Fontes, Ph.D., a Senior Lecturer at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and author of numerous publications including the books: Invisible Chains: Overcoming Coercive Control in Your Intimate Relationship, Interviewing Clients Across Cultures, and Child Abuse & Culture: Working with Diverse Families.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Linguistic Systems has 7,500 translators and interpreters available to support you. All are carefully screened, tested, and certified, and they cover 120+ languages. 

How to Increase Web Content Engagement Internationally

How to Increase Web Content Engagement Internationally

Quick Answer: Translate It

There’s a common belief that for many subject areas — academia and science, technology, financial services, and digital content come to mind – English language content is sufficient for most international customers.

But that’s a risky assumption. Here’s why.

A global study of more than 3,000 consumers in 10 countries by Common Sense Advisory asked respondents to rate their English language reading skills when buying products or services online. The result: 48% claimed to have a “good or better” understanding of English, despite missing some details.

This seems to make the opposite case – that almost half of international consumers could be served satisfactorily in English. But look closer.

The study didn’t test for English proficiency, it merely asked about consumers’ confidence levels. German citizens, who arguably have the best English language skills among the non-English countries, only rated themselves at the 48% confidence level. Some respondents from other countries who claimed higher confidence may, in fact, have less proficiency.

“… but for the other 79% of total respondents, as confidence [in English language proficiency] drops, so does engagement with English language content.”

For the 21% of respondents who were “confident” about their English language skills, they were more comfortable visiting English language sites:

• 77% visited at least daily;

• 23% visited only occasionally or rarely. But for the other 79% of total respondents, as confidence drops, so does engagement with English language content.

For respondents who rated their proficiency as “good”:

• Only 40% visit English language sites at least daily;

• 59% visit occasionally or rarely.

For respondents who assess their English skills as only “partial”:

• Only 19% visit English language sites at least daily;

• 75% visit only occasionally or rarely. Finally, for respondents who categorize their English language comprehension as “insufficient”:

• Only 7% visit English language sites at least daily;

• 72% visit rarely or never.

Visitors Spend More Time with Their Native Language

Across the 10 countries surveyed, 56% of respondents spent more time on sites in their native language or they don’t visit English language sites at all. Some 24% spent the same amount of time regardless of language.

Common Sense Advisory maintains that lack of English proficiency is a worldwide phenomenon. And as the data from their “Can’t Read, Won’t Buy” study shows, if consumers are not fully confident in their English language comprehension, an English-only web strategy is an insufficient way to engage them.

You knew we’d say that, right? But now you know why.

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Can’t Read, Won’t Buy: How Translation Affects the Web Customer Experience and E-Commerce Growth was written by Donald A. DePalma, Vijayalaxmi Hegde, and Robert G. Stewart, February 2014, published by Common Sense Advisory.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Linguistic Systems has delivered high-quality translations in 120+ languages for 50 years. Trust us with your next translation project.